"Ambulance, A&E, and some procedures need review."

About: Ayr Hospital / Trauma & orthopaedics Scottish Ambulance Service / Emergency Ambulance

(as the patient),

I managed to fall down a few of the stairs at home. Consequently I dislocated my right ankle and broke it in a few parts. Having dialled 999 an ambulance crew arrived quickly, they were really kind and offered plenty of pain relief. However I didn't want a cannula at that point and managed to Ayr Hospital with gas & air. I wished I could remember who they were but the paramedic who sat with me in the back of the ambulance, but if they recognise this story then thank you.

At Ayr hospital I was cannulated almost immediately and given strong pain relief, x-rayed and my ankle was put back in to place. Unfortunately due to the type of break and other underlying health conditions I had to be admitted to have an operation. This was performed the next day and whilst I had a spinal anaesthetic and could hear some of what was happening at no point was I in discomfort and felt safe. On the wards the staff were mostly kind.

The weekend was particularly busy and at about midnight on the Saturday I was moved from Station 10 to Station 3, this was doubtless the worst day of my stay. At that point I was told that I would go back to Station 10 ASAP. As the Sunday progressed I became more and more anxious, there had been three of us, all female, in a four bed room. By lunchtime Sunday I was the only female left and probably knew more about men's problems than I wanted to. Nobody did any obs on me, bearing in mind I was non-weight bearing on my right foot I felt totally stranded. They kept the curtains round me for a lot of the day which meant I was hot, uncomfortable and desperate to get home. My husband came to see me at visiting time and left the staff in no doubt about what the experience was doing to me. The fact that I am constantly treated for anxiety and depression is on my notes. After my husband's visit I was moved in to the six bed room next door which was all female. My move also meant that the physios lost track of me which delayed my discharge. The difference however on to an all female ward was like night and day and whilst I was still desperate to be home I coped until my discharge on the Tuesday.

Two weeks later having complained that the foot I was able to weight bear on was hurting I was x-rayed again and it was discovered that my left foot had a break in it as well. A moon boot and a cast were not quite the look I was going for! After that the staff in clinics, the physios, the OT, the physio at hydrotherapy were all fantastic. I have been told it could be up to 18 months for full recovery.

Do you have a similar story to tell? Tell your story & make a difference ››

Responses

Response from Eunice Goodwin, Patient Feedback Manager for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, Quality Improvement and Governance Team, NHS Ayrshire and Arran

picture of Eunice Goodwin

Dear Redrosie,

Thank you so much for sharing your story, it is a mixed bag really. May I say how sorry I am for those parts of your care that were less than optimal. I also can't imagine how it must feel facing a possible 18 month 'sentence' for recovery. Maybe this is a lesson to us all to remember how some everyday tasks, like going down stairs, can have a catastrophic effect.

I have a lot of people to share this with and I am sure some of them will be happy with the positive side to your story and clearly, some will be disappointed that you were distressed by the variation in your experience. I will feedback any actions or outcomes on this forum that result from your post.

I sincerely wish you as speedy recovery as possible,

Best wishes,

Eunice

  • {{helpful}} of {{total()}} people think this response is helpful

Update posted by Redrosie (the patient)

I think part of my story disappeared in my cut and paste. The lovely member of the ambulance service knew a friend of mine who had been a paramedic in Kilbirnie. We also talked about our families as we both have people living on the South Coast. As I said I wish I could remember them as I was so grateful to the care they gave me.

The OT who came out to the house arranged extra aids and we now have grab rails in bathrooms as well as extra rails on the staircase. In that way I feel fortunate as it has meant that I can retain independence in my own home. 18months may seem like a long time but I am over half way and it has meant that other health matters are now being investigated. On the whole I think NHS Ayrshire & Arran are great and certainly our own GP surgery are brilliant.

Response from Eunice Goodwin, Patient Feedback Manager for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, Quality Improvement and Governance Team, NHS Ayrshire and Arran

picture of Eunice Goodwin

Dear Redrosie,

Thank you for your lovely, additional feedback. I am very glad your recovery seems to be going well and the silver lining being that other health matters are being investigated. It is great that still independent too. I will your pass this on and I am sure they will be pleased too.

Best wishes,

Eunice

  • {{helpful}} of {{total()}} people think this response is helpful