"Clean, lovely nurses, where are the doctors?"

About: Lister Hospital

What I liked

The nurses and other people who worked on the ward were lovely- they checked all the time to see if you were OK. They offered me towels on my second day so I could have a shower.

They cleaned the ward all the time, and changed bedding most days.

Most of the time the curtains were closed for me when I was having treatment/ being talked to.

The nurses also were sympathetic to my queasy nature, covering up my cannula with a bandage, and helping me when I had to have blood taken.

The nurses also tried hard to chase up the doctors on my behalf.

What could be improved

Informing patients: I had several scans and saw numerous doctors, but I was not told about what might be wrong with me.

Availability of doctors: After an MRI scan, I waited 2 days for the doctor to come and discuss it with me. The nurses did a great job of chasing them up (at one point the doctor was on the ward but was then called away before seeing me). I appreciate that doctors are busy, but they need to appreciate that patients are very worried, especially when told things like "we are testing your blood for a tumour marker".

Medicines policy: One day I had a bad upset stomach, and asked the nurses for something like immodium/ diocalm. I was told that I could only be given this if a doctor had put it on my notes (even though if well enough I could have walked to a pharmacy and bought it myself). As I had already waited 24 hours for a doctor to see me then this seemed unlikely. With the worry of infection in hospitals I was surprised that they were not more concerned about this. And it does seem strange that a nurse could not give this to a patient as it can be bought in a supermarket.

Post- hospital information: I also found that once I discharged I had even less information. I was told I would need an operation, and given the name of the doctor. But when I phoned up I find out more, I was then told that my GP needs to make the referral, even though I came in via A&E and my GP had no knowledge of this condition. I feel that these procedures need to be explained to patients. Of course if you work in a hospital then you know this, but having never been to one before I had no idea.

Patient information: I would also have appreciated a leaflet explaining my condition and how it will be managed. I have been given no information at all, and until my next hospital appointment (6 weeks after discharge which is a very long time) I have no chance of finding anything else out.

Anything else?

The hospital was clean, and the staff you saw day to say were helpful and kind.

I am sure no-one enjoys a hospital stay, but the nurses work so hard to make it good for the patients.

Story from NHS Choices

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Responses

Response from Lister Hospital

Whilst delighted to hear how pleased you were with your nursing care, we were concerned about your comments about the medical input aspect of your experience and general information giving. We'll feed that back to the teams involved as it will help them improve the care they give in future. So many thanks for the frankness of your comments - they are much appreciated.

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