"Accident and emergency"

About: Lincoln County Hospital

I unfortunately had to attend Lincoln A+E for the 3rd time this year with arrhythmia from a long standing cardiac electrophysiology condition.On arrival the waiting room was full.I saw the receptionist who quickly took my details in a friendly manner.I was called through to the department within minutes. A nursing assistant took my observations although didn't speak to me and after taking my temperature through the probe on the floor and walked away.Around the bed space there were other probes,IV caps and packets which I picked up myself.I was quickly seen by a lovely junior doctor who took my history. The doctor discussed with the consultant and made a plan to increase my cardiac Meds and give me pain relief.I was monitored for several hours to ensure my observations returned to normal parameters.After my observations had normalised I was discharged. On leaving my nurse who was efficient and friendly however made a comment that if their heart rate was what mine had been in the department they wouldn't have come to hospital, although my cardiac history suggested otherwise.This comment made me feel undermined and I explained that it was much higher before I came to the department for help.I did feel that I shouldn't have to explain myself and have had this condition for 6 years,3 operations and still working full time as a nurse at Lincoln.On many occasions I self manage and don't seek assistance but on this occasion I was symptomatic and felt awful.However overall the service was fast,efficient and friendly.To note the previous experiences I have had in the A+E department have been fantastic

Story from NHS Choices

Do you have a similar story to tell? Tell your story & make a difference ››

Responses

Response from United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust

Dear anon

Thank you for sharing your experience with us our staff really do appreciate positive feedback from patients. I will make sure your kind comments regarding our receptionist and junior doctor are shared with the team.

I am very sorry that your experience with the nursing staff was not so positive. I expect all members of the nursing team to introduce themselves to patients and I offer you my apologies that this did not happen. Your feedback will be shared with the nursing team to ensure lessons are learnt and this deosn’t happen again. All staff must introduce themselves to patients.

The comments made by the Nurse prior to your discharge were inappropriate and unacceptable. So I can address this with the Nurse concerned I would like to speak to you directly. Please can you provide Sharon Kidd, Patient Experience Manager with your contact details. She can be contacted via email Sharon.kidd@ulh.nhs.uk

Regards

Tracy Bell

Matron A&E Lincoln

Response from Sharon Kidd, Patient Experience and Engagement Manager, Patient Experience, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust We are preparing to make a change

picture of Sharon Kidd

Dear Anon

Further to Matron's posting I would just wanted to update you regarding a proactive approach to staff introducing themselves to patients.

Dr Kate Granger, a terminal cancer patient and Leeds-based NHS registrar started a national ‘#hellomynameis’ campaign last year after she became frustrated with the number of staff at her hospital who failed to introduce themselves to her when she was an inpatient with post-operative sepsis.

Her campaign on social media platform Twitter has inspiried nurses, doctors, therapists, receptionists, porters, domestics and staff in all roles. So far over 100 NHS organisations have signed up to the campaign and ULHT is one of them.

The campaign is simple – it reminds staff to go back to basics and introduce themselves to patients properly.

The campaign has been endorsed by an increasing number of well-known figures including David Cameron, Jeremy Hunt, the Countess of Wessex, Bob Geldof and Drew Barrymore.

Our trust wide campaign launches mid July and as part of this campaign, staff are being asked to make a conscious effort to introduce themselves to all patients the first time they meet them by saying “hello my name is….and I will be looking after you today”. This is being backed up with all frontline staff being issued with new name badges which clearly show their name.

We are also reminding staff to ask the patient how they wish to be addressed and ensure their name badges are visible at all times whilst on hospital premises.

We are not only concentrating on individual introductions, but also introductions to other members of staff who may be taking over on shifts. It also involves assisting the patient so they know who they are dealing with throughout the care process and remembering that conversations by telephone are equally important.

We are also reminding staff to ask the patient how they wish to be addressed and ensure their name badges are visible at all times.

Regards

Sharon Kidd

Parient Exerience Manager

  • {{helpful}} of {{total()}} people think this response is helpful

Response from Sharon Kidd, Patient Experience and Engagement Manager, Patient Experience, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust We have made a change

picture of Sharon Kidd

Dear Anon

I just wanted to update you following my response regarding the name badges. We have launched the #hellomynameis badges for the majority of our frontline nursing and admin staff and this includes A&E at Lincoln.

Regards

Sharon Kidd, Patient Experience Manager Image title

  • {{helpful}} of {{total()}} people think this response is helpful