"A&E need to talk with the rest of the hospital"

About: Royal Bournemouth General Hospital

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This is the first time I have ever visited a hospital where clinicians don't introduce themselves by name or title ie. nurse or Dr. I went into A & E having been diagnosed with a blood clot by the hospital 4 days earlier and having had an immediate reaction to an injection. I don't have a problem in waiting to been seen by the A&E GP, but I do have a problem when I am expected to chase after the unidentified clinician, up the A&E ward, she never told me who she was, and all but told me that my reaction within minutes of taking an injection was either a needle phobia or dehydration. What I find annoying is that the DVT clinic & the Warfarin Clinic both tell patients to always carry their Anti Coagulant treatment yellow book and give it to hospital staff if taken to hospital, A&E reception, the Triage nurse & the “DR” all refused to look at it. Why the mixed messages from the same hospital?. When my carer challenged the statements given by the “DR” because I had been drinking 2 lts of water a day plus hot drinks and my reaction wasn't in keeping with the previous 4 days injections & the care instructions the other clinics had given, she decided I needed a ECG. The care assistant who came to do this asked “do you think you have had a heart attack?” this was news to me, the Dr came back, still not identifying herself but his time I could read her badge and said your tests are all clear & your blood sugar is fine – what blood sugar test? this then resulted in this being taken – I still don't know why staff don't read patient notes. I also don't understand why the DVT clinic & the Warfarin Clinic tell patients to sit with their leg raised but A&E insist this is not necessary and make you sit for 3 1/2 hours with your leg down I find these mixed messages from the same hospital very unsettling and this erodes clinical trust.

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Responses

Response from Sue Mellor, Patient Experience Lead, Royal Bournemouth & Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Thank you for providing us with your feedback and it is very disappointing to hear some aspects of your experience. We take all feedback very seriously and therefore I have been to meet with the senior nurse in the emergency department today and shared your experience with her and one of the Sisters in the department. They wanted you to know that they too are very disappointed and note some of your concerns.

With regard to staff not properly introducing themselves, we apologise and would like you to know that we are in the process of setting up some customer service training, to start next month. This was already being developed and your feedback will be an example of the impact poor communication has on our patients.

We wanted you to know that whilst you should have received a more full explanation of the tests we take, it is routine for all patients in the majors area to have the blood tests and ECGs as you mentioned in your email

With regards to your yellow book, I have been advised that it is normal for the triage nurse and team not to review anticoagulation cards because they make a full assessment at the time and the card would not necessarily impact on the triage decisions made.

Your comments will be shared with the medical team and I sincerely hope that if you ever need to visit us again we do attain the high quality standards of care we aspire to. Thank you for taking the time to place your experience on patients opinion and please know we will continue to work towards improving the quality of our compassionate care and if you would like to discuss your experience in more detail please contact our PALs department who will speak to you in total confidence. Telephone number 01202 704886 or please email pals@rbch.nhs.uk.

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Response from Royal Bournemouth General Hospital

Thank you for providing us with your feedback and it is very disappointing to hear some aspects of your experience. We take all feedback very seriously and therefore I have been to meet with the senior nurse in the emergency department today and shared your experience with her and one of the Sisters in the department. They wanted you to know that they too are very disappointed and note some of your concerns. With regard to staff not properly introducing themselves, we apologise and would like you to know that we are in the process of setting up some customer service training, to start next month. This was already being developed and your feedback will be an example of the impact poor communication has on our patients. We wanted you to know that whilst you should have received a more full explanation of the tests we take, it is routine for all patients in the majors area to have the blood tests and ECGs as you mentioned in your email With regards to your yellow book, I have been advised that it is normal for the triage nurse and team not to review anticoagulation cards because they make a full assessment at the time and the card would not necessarily impact on the triage decisions made. Your comments will be shared with the medical team and I sincerely hope that if you ever need to visit us again we do attain the high quality standards of care we aspire to. Thank you for taking the time to place your experience on patients opinion and please know we will continue to work towards improving the quality of our compassionate care and if you would like to discuss your experience in more detail please contact our PALs department who will speak to you in total confidence. Telephone number 01202 704886 or please email pals@rbch.nhs.uk.

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